Fred Talk – Blending skills.

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At school we use a puppet called Fred who can only speak in sounds, not whole words.  We call this Fred Talk.

For example, Fred would say d-o-g, we would say dog.  Your child is taught to hear sounds and blend them together in sequence to make a word.  We start with blending oral sounds, then progress to reading the letters and blending them together to read the word.

Here is a small clip of Fred Talk in action

FRED TALK helps children read unfamiliar words by pronouncing each sound in the word one at a time. Children can start blending sounds into words as soon as they know a small group of letters well. Sound blending is essential in reading. Here are some ideas to help your child blend the sounds in words.

 Some sounds are made of 2 letters together:

th         sh         qu        ch         ng        nk       ss         ll           gg         bb        ff          ay         ee

 ‘th’ is one sound (stick out your tongue, thhhhh) It is not a ‘t’ then ‘h’ sound.

Consonants together:

Some sounds are together in a word but are two diferetn pure sounds that need to be heard separately.

 Skip                 Don’t pronounce it sk-i-p

                          Say the sounds s-k-i-p

 Climb             Don’t say cl-i-mb

                          Say c-l-i-mb

 Class              Don’t say cl-a-s-s

                         Say c-l-a-ss

 Shoe             Don’t say s-h-o-e

                        Say sh-oo

 Sink               Don’t say s-i-n-k

                        Say s-i-nk

 Think            Don’t say t-h-i-n-k

                        Say th-i-nk  (It’s the pure sounds your child needs to hear)

 Difficulties with Fred Talk:

Always go back to oral Fred Talking. Using pictures or objects, ask your child to find the ‘c-a-t’ or ‘p-i-g’ for example – if they can put the spoken sounds together to find the correct picture, they will eventually learn to do the same with written sounds.

Games at home:  

  • Put out 3 pictures of objects: Pen, mop, dog.  Ask your child:  ‘Can you give me the ‘d-o-g’

  At home, make it fun, talk to your child in Fred talk

‘Go and get your c-oa-t

‘Do you want to go to the p-ar-k?’

‘Can you touch your kn-ee-s?’

‘Can you touch your t-oe-s?’

‘Do you want t-oa-s-t for breakfast?’

‘It’s time for b-e-d.’

Remember to focus on sounds

 Hope this helps – feedback always appreciated!

 Mrs Quinn.

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5 thoughts on “Fred Talk – Blending skills.

    1. A digraph is a single sound, or phoneme, which is represented by two letters. A trigraph is a phoneme which consists of three letters. However, many people will simply use the term ‘digraph’ generally to describe both combinations. In digraphs, consonants join together to form a kind of consonant team, which makes a special sound. For instance, p and h combine to form ph, which makes the /f/ sound as in phonemic.

      When two or more consonants appear together and you hear each sound that each consonant would normally make, the consonant team is called a consonant blend. For instance, the word blend has two consonant blends: bl, for which you hear the sounds for both b and l, and nd, for which you hear the sounds for both n and d.

      Digraphs

      ch, which makes the /ch/ sound as in watch, chick, chimpanzee, and champion
      ck, which makes the /k/ sound as in chick
      ff, which makes the /f/ sound as in cliff
      gh, which makes the /g/ sound as in ghost and ghastly
      gn, which makes the /n/ sound as in gnome and gnarled
      kn, which makes the /n/ sound as in knife and knight
      ll, which makes the /l/ sound as in wall
      mb, which makes the /m/ sound as in lamb and thumb
      ng, which makes the /ng/ sound as in fang, boomerang, and fingerprint
      nk, which makes the /nk/ sound as in ink, sink and rink
      ph, which makes the /f/ sound as in digraph, phone, and phonics
      qu, which makes the /kw/ sound as in quick
      sh, which makes the /sh/ sound as in shore, shipwreck, shark, and shield
      ss, which makes the /s/ sound as in floss
      th, which makes the /th/ sound as in athlete, toothbrush, bathtub, thin, and thunderstorm
      th, which makes the /th/ sound as in this, there, and that
      wh, which makes the /hw/ sound as in where and which
      wr, which makes the /wr/ sound as in write
      zz, which makes the /z/ sound as in fuzz and buzz
      Trigraphs

      chr, which makes the /chr/ sound as in chrome and chromosome
      dge, which makes the /g/ sound as in dodge and partridge
      tch, which makes the /tch/ sound as in catch, match

  1. A digraph is a single sound, or phoneme, which is represented by two letters. A trigraph is a phoneme which consists of three letters. However, many people will simply use the term ‘digraph’ generally to describe both combinations. In digraphs, consonants join together to form a kind of consonant team, which makes a special sound. For instance, p and h combine to form ph, which makes the /f/ sound as in phonemic.

    When two or more consonants appear together and you hear each sound that each consonant would normally make, the consonant team is called a consonant blend. For instance, the word blend has two consonant blends: bl, for which you hear the sounds for both b and l, and nd, for which you hear the sounds for both n and d.

    Digraphs

    ch, which makes the /ch/ sound as in watch, chick, chimpanzee, and champion
    ck, which makes the /k/ sound as in chick
    ff, which makes the /f/ sound as in cliff
    gh, which makes the /g/ sound as in ghost and ghastly
    gn, which makes the /n/ sound as in gnome and gnarled
    kn, which makes the /n/ sound as in knife and knight
    ll, which makes the /l/ sound as in wall
    mb, which makes the /m/ sound as in lamb and thumb
    ng, which makes the /ng/ sound as in fang, boomerang, and fingerprint
    nk, which makes the /nk/ sound as in ink, sink and rink
    ph, which makes the /f/ sound as in digraph, phone, and phonics
    qu, which makes the /kw/ sound as in quick
    sh, which makes the /sh/ sound as in shore, shipwreck, shark, and shield
    ss, which makes the /s/ sound as in floss
    th, which makes the /th/ sound as in athlete, toothbrush, bathtub, thin, and thunderstorm
    th, which makes the /th/ sound as in this, there, and that
    wh, which makes the /hw/ sound as in where and which
    wr, which makes the /wr/ sound as in write
    zz, which makes the /z/ sound as in fuzz and buzz
    Trigraphs

    chr, which makes the /chr/ sound as in chrome and chromosome
    dge, which makes the /g/ sound as in dodge and partridge
    tch, which makes the /tch/ sound as in catch, match

  2. This has been really helpful! My child has been struggling in school at grasping the blending of words ! We had parents evening where the teacher was less than helpful ! So this has been amazing ! Thanks so much!

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